Camping is the perfect way to test your survival skills in a relatively controlled environment. For those who have never been or have little experience camping, we highly recommend picking an established camp site, with other campers nearby, just in case. Minor medical emergencies can quickly turn into life ­threatening events if you're not prepared to deal with them. As you become more familiar with your equipment and how to use it, you can venture farther and farther from established areas, putting your anti ­zombie skills to the test. Camping in remote areas not only allows you to test your survival skills, it also gives you the opportunity to practice your marksmanship and your tactical skills without alarming other campers. You will, however, want to be aware of hunting seasons and popular hunting areas. Wearing hunter orange over your tactical gear might be uncomfortable, but it beats coming back to town strapped to the hood of a rusty old pick ­up truck. It's all about survival, and the only difference between camping and surviving is whether you're doing it for recreation or doing it to save your life. Your camping equipment is your survival equipment; it's all basically the same. As with any equipment, you get what you pay for but shouldn't pay for more than you need. For example; don't expect a bottom ­of­the ­line discount store tent to keep you dry in torrential rains, and don't get an arctic sleeping bag if you live in Arizona. Ideally, all of your camping/ survival gear should be able to be carried on your person (see BUG ­OUT bags),but different people have different abilities and possibly different means of transportation. All of your gear, however, should be in line with your SHTF plan, so that not only will you have what you need, when you need it, but if you practice your camping, you'll also know how to use it.

Camping